Weekly "Teaching and Learning Tips" -- Collectively Supporting Learning

Submit a tip! It's easy, just follow the steps on the T&L Tips Submission page.

Tip Table of Contents:

Dr. Micaela Szykman Gunther working with wildlife students in the field

Tip #16: Finals Week – The Home Stretch!

We have arrived at Finals Week! As our students gear up for this last push, consider passing along the Academic and Career Advising Center’s Finals Week Tips and Resources and the link to the HSU Library Brain Booth where students can take a ‘brain break’ between finals. Here at the CTL we are particularly proud to look back on our first 15 weeks of Teaching and Learning Tips. We’ve covered everything from resources to supporting students of concern to introducing inclusive teaching strategies in the classroom. As you begin course planning for the spring, consider incorporating Semester on a Page or reflection exercises into your classes. For these and more, see the CTL Tip archive.

Have a wonderful, restful break! And as always, let us know how the CTL can support your work!

Tip #15: ‘Tis the Season for Grading!

As we wrap up the semester, you may find yourself dealing with last minute grading questions. The Academic Technology team has been hard at work creating HSU specific Canvas guides to make your final grading process as smooth as possible. Below is a link to a compilation of Canvas grading resources. If these guides don’t meet your grading needs, please feel free to contact the campus Canvas support team: at@humboldt.edu or (707) 826-4461.

Have you tried using Canvas SpeedGrader?

As an instructor, SpeedGrader allows you to view and grade student assignment submissions in one place using a simple point scale or complex rubric. You can use SpeedGrader to:

  • Sort submissions by student and hide student names for anonymous grading
  • View submission details for each student, including resubmitted assignments
  • Use rubrics to assign grades  
  • Leave feedback for your students
  • Track your grading progress and hide assignments while grading
  • View submissions in moderated assignments

Resources

Contributed by Academic Technology

Tip #14: What Are Inclusive Teaching Strategies?

Inclusive teaching strategies refer to any number of teaching approaches that address the needs of students with a variety of backgrounds, learning styles, and abilities. These strategies contribute to an overall inclusive learning environment, in which students feel equally valued. “Even though some of us might wish to conceptualize our classrooms as culturally neutral or might choose to ignore the cultural dimensions, students cannot check their sociocultural identities at the door, nor can they instantly transcend their current level of development… Therefore, it is important that the pedagogical strategies we employ in the classroom reflect an understanding of social identity development so that we can anticipate the tensions that might occur in the classroom and be proactive about them” (Ambrose et. al., 2010, p. 169-170).

Some benefits of inclusive teaching are:

  • You can connect with and engage with a variety of students.
  • You are prepared for “spark moments” or issues that arise when controversial material is discussed.
  • Students connect with course materials that are relevant to them.
  • Students feel comfortable in the classroom environment to voice their ideas/thoughts/questions.
  • Students are more likely to experience success in your course through activities that support their learning styles, abilities, and backgrounds.

How can you teach inclusively?

Be reflective by asking yourself the following:

  • How might your own cultural-bound assumptions influence your interactions with students?
  • How might the backgrounds and experiences of your students influence their motivation, engagement, and learning in your classroom?
  • How can you modify course materials, activities, assignments, and/or exams to be more accessible to all students in your class?

Contributed by Dr. Ramona Bell, CRGS and ODEI

Resources (Contributed by Cheryl Johnson, ODEI)

References:

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M.W., DiPietro, M. & Lovett, M.C. (2010). How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass.

Armstrong, M.A. (2011). Small world: Crafting an inclusive classroom (no matter what you teach). Thought and Action, Fall, 51-61.

Hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to transgress. New York, NY: Routledge Press.

Kaplan, M. & Miller, A. T. (Eds.). (2007). Special Issue: Scholarship of multicultural teaching and learning. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, (111).

Warren, L. (2006). Managing hot moments in the classroom. Retrieved from: http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/html/icb.topic58474/hotmoments.html

Salazar, M., Norton, A., & Tuitt, F. (2009). Weaving promising practices for inclusive excellence into the higher education classroom. In L.B. Nilson and J.E. Miller (Eds.) To Improve the Academy. (208-226). Jossey-Bass.

Tip #13: Supporting Students Before and After the Break

Support starts with the guideline: “Assume nothing”

  • Don’t assume the student went anywhere for the holidays.  If they did go home, don’t assume it was necessarily a positive experience.
  • Holidays can be very mixed for our students.  Some go home to happy loving families and others go back to more difficult scenarios—homes where they experienced trauma or neglect….or back to parent/s that have very different political views that can feel negating of a student’s very identity (e.g., LGBTQ) or life’s passions (e.g., environment, civil rights/social justice).
  • Some students have no home or don’t have the finances to travel.  They may feel “stuck” here and “abandoned” by their friends who have left for the holidays. Others may welcome the quiet time and see it as a chance to catch up on their studies and Netflix binge watching.

It takes patience, understanding, and adjustments for these transitions. Here are a few things you might consider to support your students (and you!):

Before leaving for break

  • Suggest they start a day or two before the break is over to reset and get back into the swing of their routine (set alarms!)
  • Find time for socializing/reconnecting with friends before classes are back in session
  • Take a moment to go over their schedule/planner for the last few weeks
  • Write a few goals for the last few weeks of the semester

Returning from break

  • Send a class announcement in Canvas or email at the end of the break that lets students know that you are looking forward to seeing them and that they only have three weeks left
  • Offer an opportunity to ease your students back into HSU life, e.g., routines, invite to office hours to reconnect, tell students that you care about their wellbeing, leave room for students to have their own unique experiences
  • Recommend the student practice good self-care and engage in routines.  If someone is having trouble adapting back to campus, it is not the time to stop going to class or to come home to an empty fridge or ignore sleep.
  • Remind students to finish strong, e.g., motivational activity in groups to reconnect to peers, self-reflective activity
  • Provide an opportunity for students to review previous academic achievements and provide feedback

Contributed by HSU Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

Resources:

Tip #12: Reflection Facilitates Deeper Learning

HSU currently has thirteen Service Learning courses serving in our community this semester if you include three of our newest Service Learning courses that are piloting a community based portion.  As we are entering the final third of the semester the assignments in these courses are beginning to turn to reflection and requiring students to connect the content of their courses and the meaningful experiences they have had in the community.

Reflection is a core component of all Service Learning because it facilitates the deep connection between meeting a community need, the content of a course, and the personal growth and learning for the student involved.  For example, Mitchell (2008) captures the power of reflection in learning about issues related to social justice when she talks about how simple service can become a deep learning experience when you connect it to critical analysis and engagement.  A student serving food at a food pantry learns a lot about the structures of inequality and social justice when they begin to reflect upon the conditions that lead to the need for food pantries in the first place or reflect on their own positionality as a service provider faced with community needs. Combined with relevant course content, this kind of learning carries impact and reflection serves to drive it down deep.

Of course, reflection is not just for Service Learning or for topics related to social justice.  It can be a valuable teaching tool for any learning experience and applied to any type of course content.  Please see the attached “Reflection Collection” activities for getting started with reflective activities in your own classroom.  If you have great activities of your own we invite you to share them with us at CTL.

Contributed by Loren Collins, Academic and Career Advising Center

Bloomquist, C. (2015). Reflecting on reflection as a critical component in service learning. Journal of Education for Library & Information Science 56(2). 169–72.

Mitchell, T. D. (2008). Traditional vs. critical service-learning: Engaging the literature to differentiate two models. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning 14(2).

Mitchell, T.D. (2014). How service-learning enacts social justice sensemaking. Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis 2(2). 6.

Teaching and Learning TipTip #11: Do We Really Know Our HSU Students?

What if it were true that HSU seniors….

  • Spent an average of 15 hours per week preparing for class
  • 60% received prompt and detailed feedback from faculty
  • 82% rated their educational experience as “excellent” or “good”
  • 8 out of 10 reported that they experienced high-impact practices (pedagogy, hands-on, service learning, capstone, etc.)
  • About 64% seniors and 78% of first year students indicated they 'never' or 'sometimes' discussed course ideas, concepts or other course related things outside of class with faculty
  • Over 90% are Millennials/Generation Y (born between 1980-2000)

What if it were true that HSU faculty...

  • 64% spent between 1-4 hours per week on improving their teaching
  • About 37% are Baby Boomers (born between 1943-1964), about 38% are Generation X (born between 1965-1979) and about 25% are Millennials/Generation Y (born between 1980-2000)

If these were true...what does this mean and how might we think about learning and student engagement in new ways? Come find out about these and other important data to bust the myths and corroborate the findings this Friday, November 3, in Goodwin Forum 9:00 - 11:00 am. Dr. Lisa Castellino, Associate Vice President of the Office of Institutional Effectiveness, will share the findings from HSU’s participation in the 2017 Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE) (perceptions of instructional staff) and how this contextualizes the student responses to the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE).

Did you miss the NSSE presentation in September? Watch the recording: NSSE Presentation by Dr. Lisa Castellino

Teaching and Learning TipTip #10: Tips on Advising Student Athletes

Your advice could impact a player’s eligibility and their career.

Did you know? There are over 400 student-athletes at Humboldt State in any given year. That’s over 5% of our student population. Student-athletes are enrolled in over 37 different majors and participating in over 60 options/concentrations. On average, student-athletes have higher GPA’s and better outcomes than other students.

Why do Student-Athletes have better outcomes on average? To remain eligible to play, they must keep progressing towards degree, and maintain acceptable GPAs despite traveling for 20-30 days a term, and participating in their sport for up to 20 hours per week. Athletics also runs study halls that are mandated for many athletes.

Tips on advising student-athletes:

  • Please keep major contracts up to date with the registrar’s office.
  • Make sure students are enrolled in at least 12 units each term.
  • Units must be degree applicable as described on their DARS.
  • Remember, these students must pass at least 24 degree-applicable units a year.
  • If you anticipate a shortfall in units, please help them find a summer option.
  • Please fill out mid-term, student evaluations.  These are critical for advising athletes.
  • Contact Athletics with any questions.  The NCAA requirements are numerous!

Contributed by Duncan Robin, Athletics

Teaching and Learning TipTip #9: Low Tech Ways to Implement Universal Design for Learning into Your Classroom

Special Announcement: Join the Center for Learning & Teaching (CTL) Celebration, October 26th 3-5pm, Library third floor. Find out more about the CTL, be part of the future vision, and meet all the partners in this fun event with food and prizes.

You may have heard about Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as a framework for learning that reduces barriers for students who experience disabilities.  If so, you are definitely on the right track. UDL, which was developed to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people, is based on scientific insights into how humans learn.  The UDL guidelines focus on three brain networks: Engagement, Representation, and Action & Expression.  When these networks are activated, learning is optimized.  UDL is often associated with technology, but there are plenty of low-tech ways to activate each of these network.  Here are some ideas for each area:

Engagement

  • give students choices
  • vary assignments so that the opportunities remain fresh and exciting
  • build in opportunities for reflection
  • look for ways to apply your content to daily situations
  • create a learning environment where student feel safe and willing to take risks

Representation

  • present information in several different ways
  • look for content in current media
  • highlight big ideas
  • always start with a review
  • clarify vocabulary

Action & Expression

  • use active learning strategies every class
  • provide opportunities for student to share what they understand with each other
  • engage students in goal setting
  • teach students how to monitor their progress
  • consider having student complete a grading rubric when turning in assignments

Explore UDL further with these links:

Contributed by Jayne McGuire, Kinesiology and Recreation

Teaching and Learning TipTip #8: Did You Receive (and are you wearing) Your "1 in 10" Button?

October is Disability Awareness Month and the Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC) created and distributed buttons to help raise awareness to the fact that approximately 1 in 10 individuals is living with a disability.  That’s right…approximately 10% of the population have a disability which means that you, as a member of the HSU community, can expect that approximately 10% of our students will have one or more disabilities.

Not All Disabilities Are Visible

When thinking about disabilities, most people think of individuals who are blind and use a white cane or individuals who use wheelchairs.  However, not all disabilities are apparent or visible.  In fact, many if not most, disabilities are non-apparent which means that you will not know if an individual has a disability simply by looking at them.  Psychological, learning, and health-related disabilities are non-apparent disabilities and are the disabilities with which the majority of students with disabilities at HSU are living.

Things You Can Do

Faculty, here are things you can do to ensure that you are meeting the needs of all of your students, including students with disabilities:

  • Consider structuring your curriculum, activities, and assignments using the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL).  See the UDL tip next week!
  • Notify the Bookstore of your textbook adoptions for the upcoming semester before the established deadline
  • Ensure the documents you create such as your syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, exams, etc. are accessible
  • Ensure videos used in your classroom or posted in Canvas are captioned
  • Ensure documents posted to Canvas or instructional-related websites are accessible (i.e., text-based PDF files…not image-only PDF files )
  • Speak clearly while facing the class (do not lecture while facing the whiteboard or screen)
  • Ensure the accessible furniture provided in each classroom (height-adjustable table and chair) is easy for students to access and not moved to the corner “out of the way” or to a different classroom altogether
  • Consult with the SDRC if you have questions or concerns about accommodating a student with a disability

We Would Like to Hear from You

In our SDRC spring survey, an overwhelming number of you asked for training and resources to assist you in supporting students with disabilities.  Please look for an upcoming survey to let us know what specific resources and trainings you'd like. We appreciate your feedback!

Resources:

Contributed by Cassandra Tex, Student Disability Resource Center

Teaching and Learning TipTip #7: Creating Significant Learning Experiences by Engaging Career Aspirations in the Classroom

Last year, more that 15 majors and 30 classes included career exploration, field-specific research of job opportunities, resume development, informational interviews and/or mock interviews within their courses. More than 300 students participated in practice interviews and more than 400 participated in creating resumes related to their fields of interest.  This is a result of the innovative work of a number of our colleagues here at Humboldt State. Over the past few years faculty have been experimenting with and designing lesson plans that integrate career preparedness into their syllabi and coursework. HSU is ahead of the game for the time being as faculty are dedicating a little bit of time and effort toward helping students translate their experience in the classroom to their future aspirations. What makes HSU unique is the scope of our project and our approach to custom designing our career education to fit each participating major.

In Creating Significant Learning Experiences, Fink (2013) presents a taxonomy for significant learning experiences and states that for learning to occur there needs to be a lasting change in the learner that is important to their life.  Fink outlines six kinds of significant learning:

  • Foundational Knowledge

  • Application

  • Integration

  • Human Dimension

  • Caring

  • Learning how to learn

We can address at least five of these areas by simply leading students through activities that require them to explore their future aspirations, career opportunities and requirements, and how their education connects to real life scenarios.  These kind of classroom activities helps our disciplines speak directly to student interests and the underlying concerns they have for their future.  Faculty that have implemented these kinds of assignments have significant returns on these investments and cite that students often become more committed, confident, and purposeful in their chosen pathways.

The CAHSS Career Curriculum Committee has drawn on the work of 8 members of CAHSS Faculty and staff from the Academic and Career Advising Center to provide you with resources that can help you easily integrate these kinds of experiences in your own courses.  We also encourage you to share with us any of your own activities and innovations.

 

HSU’s Academic and Career Advising Center and the College of the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences’ Career Curriculum Program: http://www2.humboldt.edu/acac/curriculum

Fink, L.D. (2013). Creating significant learning experiences: an integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

McDow, L.W. & Zabrucky, K.M. (2015). Effectiveness of a career development course on students’ job search skills and self-efficacy. Journal of College Student Development 56(6), 632–636.

Mills, A.G. & Sutera, J. (2012). Case Studies of curricular approaches. New Directions for Student Services 2012(138), 75–90.

Folsom, B. & Reardon, R. (2003). College career courses: design and accountability. Journal of Career Assessment 11(4), 421–50.

Contributed by Loren Collins, Academic and Career Advising Center

Teaching and Learning TipTip #6 Design Your Learning Through SkillShops

Pick up a new skill, learn about a new technology, and help prepare yourself to reach your personal, academic and professional goals.

Co-Curricular Learning

SkillShops are 50-minute drop-in workshops focused on introducing and developing a wide range of skills and are designed to support learners through the encouragement of play, discovery, and social interaction. During the 2016/2017 academic year, HSU SkillShops attendance topped 1,600 and included 22 partners from across campus who facilitated workshops. Although SkillShops began as a program by the Library, it is now a cross-campus collaboration that offers students, staff and faculty an engaging personalized and professional learning experience.

Each SkillShop is assigned to one of five themes: Personal Growth, College & Study Skills, Leadership & Career, Technology & Digital Media and Finding & Using Information. This next week will include SkillShops on a wide range of topics including:

Students, faculty, and staff are invited to design their learning by attending a relevant SkillShop! Visit the full calendar to pre-register or view the calendar for the next two weeks.

Integrate SkillShops as a Class Assignment

You can assign students to attend SkillShops to develop their understanding of topics needed for your class or discipline. You can also work with us to have specific SkillShops offered at a time in the semester that coincides with an assignment. Interested in how you can use SkillShops for your class or to help your students? Contact us with any questions, requests or ideas you may have: skillshops@humboldt.edu. If you are planning on offering extra credit to your students who attend SkillShops, you can have them track their attendance and get a snapshot of their learning by having them fill out a worksheet asking them to reflect on what they learned at the workshop and how they will use their new skills.

Online SkillShops

This semester we started offering online, asynchronous SkillShops. All students, faculty and staff are invited to enroll in these SkillShops through Canvas:

  • Getting Started with WordPress
    You'll create a basic blog with your first post and About page in this online SkillShop.

  • Getting Started with Camtasia
    In this online SkillShop you will create a short screen capture with several edits to enhance your video.

  • Research Basics
    Learn how to get started with searching in online databases. You will create a short bibliography of the sources you find.

SkillShops Leaderboard

Check out the SkillShops Leaderboard where students, faculty and staff vie for the top spot! Attending a SkillShop earns you 100 points. Creating a digital project about a SkillShop earns you up to 200 points. Sign up to compete on the Leaderboard now!

Skilled Learners

A Skilled Learner takes 5 SkillShops in a semester in at least three different categories (Personal Growth, College & Study Skills, Technology & Digital Media, Leadership & Career and Finding & Using Information). Once you have completed the 5 SkillShops you can apply for the Skilled Learner Certificate. Your name is added to the Library website. In the semester you complete the certificate you and your fellow Skilled Learners are invited to a party to celebrate your accomplishment.

Share Your Expertise

SkillShops are facilitated by faculty, staff, administrators and student leaders on campus. Contact skillshops@humboldt.edu if you have questions or ideas about sharing your passion and expertise for a topic as a SkillShop.

Contributed by Sarah Fay Philips, Library

Teaching and Learning TipTip #5 Supporting Our Students Through Challenging Times

Though the situation continues to be fluid and quite confusing, we wanted to send along information on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) for this week’s teaching and learning tip.  Please see these helpful student resources provided by Tessa Pitre and Laura Hahn in the English Department, and the Scholars Without Borders Program at HSU:

Our role in supporting our students is to help them navigate this difficult time – to acknowledge and help them manage the anxiety they are likely feeling.  In a message to faculty last week in the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, Dean Lisa Bond-Maupin noted “the complexities of our students' needs and experiences.”  She went on to give some excellent advice as to managing these complexities:

I understand as a long-time faculty member myself how difficult it can be to determine how to best support our students within our roles and in our classrooms. I wish someone had told me that it is okay to let students know that I am not sure how best to be there for them - that I don't fully understand what they are going through or what the answers are - AND that I care about what they are experiencing.

Other notable activities to be aware of on campus include Scholars Without Borders in the Multicultural Center.  They are a great resource, and will also be providing free DACA renewal legal help.  

Finally, look for the October 3rd First Dialogue in the Diversity Dialogues Series, Defending DACA: A Dialogue on What Now?

Resources for Faculty

Teaching and Learning TipTip #4: Helping Students Learn How to Learn

Did you know that the brain is not fully developed until about age 25 (Giedd, Blumenthal, Jeffries, Castellanos, Liu, Zijdenbos, Rapoport, 1999)?!  How can we support this development in our college students and what are some of the optimal conditions for learning? Brain-based learning is a fascinating science of understanding how we learn. When one begins to understand how they learn, they can then understand how to most effectively adapt and transfer to new contexts for successful learning (Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, 2000). According to Doyle, 2011, the human brain is designed to explore and learn. This is made more effective with practice. Practice over extended periods of time helps our neurons become stronger and faster, because these make permanent connections/memories in our brain that later help us to transfer this knowledge to new learning (Doyle & Zakrajsek, 2013).

What helps our students learn (Doyle & Zakrajsek, 2013):

  • Sleep is vital - 7.5-9 hours of sleep per night is ideal (memories are made during sleep)
  • Exercise improves learning (also improves motivation)
  • Multi-sensory learning increases probability of retaining information
  • Practice, practice, practice (“the more work your brain does, the greater the number of connections established”)
  • Real-life, meaningful and authentic learning induces dopamine, which has been shown to help learners retain new information
  • The brain is social; we evolved to collaborate with others
  • Feedback is a key element in creating a growth mindset (mindset: understanding a learner's belief in their own abilities/traits to learn) (See Mindset: How You Can Fulfill Your Potential by Carol Dweck)

Strategies:

Look for upcoming CTL Teaching & Learning Tips on: Metacognition, Mindset, and Transference

Contributed by Kim Vincent-Layton, Center for Teaching & Learning

References:

  • Bransford, J.D., Brown, A. L., and Cocking, R.R. (2000). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

  • Doyle, T (2011, March). How Brain Research Findings are Changing Our Understanding of Learning. Keynote presentation at the Lilly West Conference Series on University Teaching and Learning: Evidence-based Teaching and Learning, Pomona, CA.

  • Doyle, T., & Zakrajsek, T. (2013). The new science of learning: how to learn in harmony with your brain. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

  • Giedd, J. N., Blumenthal, J., Jeffries, N. O., Castellanos, F. X., Liu, H., Zijdenbos, A., Rapoport, J. L. (1999). Brain development during childhood and adolescence: a longitudinal MRI study. Nature Neuroscience, 2(10), 861–3.

Teaching and Learning TipTip #3: Academic Concern for a student?

Use the HSU Early Alert software platform, “Skyfactor Mapworks”!! Check out the Camtasia video links below to see how to access our early alert system, Skyfactor Mapworks, and how to notify the Mapworks Central Coordinator about an academic concern you have for a student (the student must either be an advisee or current coursework student). The coordinator will contact support personnel and let them know the referral exists. The author of the referral will receive an email indicating when the referral has been closed (coinciding with verified attempts to contact the student of concern or verification of interaction regarding the note of concern).  Referrals are visible to professional advisors, RAMP Mentors and faculty advisors; please use professional, and non-judgmental language and recognize this system is not designed for issues of concern addressed by the Dean of Students and the CARE system.

Questions? Please contact Tracy Smith, Director, Retention through Academic Mentoring Program (RAMP), and Skyfactor Mapworks Central Coordinator, 826-5251, tracy.smith@humboldt.edu

Contributed by: Tracy Smith, RAMP

Teaching and Learning TipTip #2: Semester on a Page

The beginning of the semester can be overwhelming for both students and faculty alike. Semester-on-a-Page can help you and your students plan out the semester before you get in too deep. The at-a-glance calendar includes important university deadlines and can be downloaded as a PDF or Word document. Encourage your students to add major class deadlines and exams so that they have a visual of how the semester lays out--and can plan accordingly. (Faculty also find it useful to plan out their semester too!)

Fall 2017 Semester-on-a-Page can be found on the Learning Center's website under the "Handouts" page: http://www2.humboldt.edu/learning/handout-index.

Contributed by Su Karl, Learning Center

Teaching and Learning TipTip #1: Explore Your Center for Teaching & Learning (CTL)

Welcome to the new Center for Teaching and Learning!

The Center provides opportunities for learner-centered, culturally relevant experiences through campus and community partnerships. The CTL is HSU’s commitment to inspiring and innovating teaching excellence.  You will find a variety of programming throughout the year that supports continuous learning.

This is the first Teaching & Learning Tip in a series of weekly tips that you will receive as we launch Phase I of the Center. In these tips, you will find out about all things ‘teaching and learning’.

Explore the CTL Website:

  • Find a resource
  • Engage in one of the many programming events - check out the Events Calendar
  • Request a consultation with CTL staff and/or drop by the CTL on the third floor of the Library
  • Send feedback to the CTL - what would you like to see?
  • Submit a tip! Take a look at the T&L Tip Submissions.

We are excited to be on this teaching and learning journey with the campus community and look forward to all that we can do together